A Kale Massage

Kale massage is not what you think. This is a delicious salad for your inside, not something to rub on your outside. Kale’s dark green leaves are one of the healthiest greens you can eat.

kale

I first saw this recipe prepared on a TV cooking shows. Aarti Sequeria was making a kale salad. I was thinking tough kale leaves in a salad! Who would want to eat that? The secret is in the massage. The tough center rib of the kale is removed and the kale cut into bit-size pieces. It is then massaged with lemon juice, a drizzle of olive oil and salt. After two or three minutes the leaves turn darker green and soften. The original recipe calls for mango. I have made this salad with oranges, canned peaches, even once an apple because it was all I had. It is one of my favorite salads.

The salad lasts for days in the fridge if you don’t eat it all the first day. I think it’s even better the second day. The kale in my community garden bed is getting big enough to cut. I can’t wait to make this salad. This link even has a video of Aarti making the salad and shows how to prepare the raw kale. At the bottom of the page are many more kale salad recipes. Who knew?

Imagine my surprise to find another kale salad recipe at a recent culinary gathering at the St. Michaels Woman’s Club. I thought I was the only one who knew about massaging kale. This is Karen Thomas’ Kale Salad recipe.

  • 1/2 cup pecans
  • 8 ounces kale
  • 4 to 5 medium radishes
  • 1/2 cup dried cranberries (or cherries)
  • 1 medium Granny Smith apple
  • 2 ounces soft goat cheese, chilled

Dressing

  • 3 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons apple cider vinegar (or white wine vinegar)
  • 1 tablespoon smooth Dijon mustard
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons honey
  • Sea salt and freshly ground pepper, to taste

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees and spread the pecans on a baking tray. Toast them until lightly golden and fragrant, about 5 to 10 minutes, tossing them once or twice to make sure they bake evenly. Remove the tray from the oven and set them aside to cool.
  2. Pull the kale leaves off from the tough stems and discard the stems. Use a chef’s knife to chop the kale into small, bite-sized pieces. Transfer the kale to a big salad bowl. Sprinkle a small pinch of sea salt over the kale and massage the leaves with your hands by lightly scrunching big handfuls at a time, until the leaves are darker in color and fragrant.
  3. Thinly slice the radishes (this is easier to do if you first chop off the root end so you can place the base of the radish flat against your cutting board). Add them to the bowl.
  4. Coarsely chop the pecans and cherries and add them to the bowl. Chop the apple into small, bite-sized pieces and add it to the bowl as well. Crumble the goat cheese over the top.
  5. In a small bowl, whisk the dressing ingredients together and pour the dressing over the salad. Toss until the salad is evenly coated with dressing. Serve immediately, or for even better flavor, let the salad marinate in the dressing for 10 to 20 minutes beforehand.

Even if you think you don’t like kale, give kale salad a try. Kale is also a great fall/winter crop for your community garden bed. We ate kale salad into the spring this year. The kale just got more luscious after a frost.

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Grow Vertically: Make an Easy Trellis

Pennie Haase (bed #26) writes: This year I wanted to get the most out of my new garden bed, so I decided to grow up. Online I found lots of trellis ideas on square foot gardening websites. A quick trip to Lowes and $14 later I had everything I needed:

Materials for trellis

After measuring the bed, I had my husband cut the one piece of conduit, then laid everything out on the garage floor to see if in fact it would work.  A few minutes later we headed down to the garden and quickly assembled the trellis.   He pounded the rebar, tightened the screws and I tied.  My peas are just starting to grow, so we’ll see how well it works.

My Trellis at the Community Garden:

Pennie's Trellis

Pennie’s Trellis

Materials: (Lowes in Easton):3 – 5’ lengths ½” EMT Conduit ($1.65 each – aisle 14); 2 – ½” EMT to EMT pull elbows ($2.71 each – aisle 14); 2 – rebar pins ½” x 4’ (2.98 each – aisle 53 );1 – trellis netting 5’ x 15’ ($4.97 – outside garden area)

Optional Materials: 1 – 4’ stake for bottom; 2 – tie down stakes/irrigation stakes or cut coat hangers

Tools: Hacksaw, Hammer, Screwdriver, Tape measure, Scissors, Use hacksaw to cut off 13 1/2″ conduit from one 5’ section – this will be the top.

Note – measure your bed to ensure that it is 48″ on the interior

How To: Attach elbows to top of other two 5’ sections – these will be the sides.

Unroll trellis and measure out 6’ length x 5’ width, thread one side conduit down 6’ length alternating the conduit in and out of the squares, measure over 4’ and thread the other side section. Attach top by threading through alternating squares. Cut netting to fit, allowing extra for tying.

Pound rebar inside the corners 2’, don’t mash down top of rebar or it will not slide inside the conduit. Slide the conduit over the rebar, square it up, push conduit into ground to stabilize and tighten screws on the elbows.

Tie off the squares of netting to top and sides or use wire ties.

Optional: Pennie added a stabilizing stake to the bottom, threading it through alternating squares and securing it to the ground with irrigation stakes.

Info from Square Foot Gardening – also on the web: http://hedgehoghill.blogspot.com/2013/02/square-foot-gardening-on-gulf-coast_27.html